News

Conservatives Mock Snowflakes Over "Baby It's Cold Outside" Meltdown

Every year the assault in Christmas intensifies. First came the banishment of “Merry Christmas” – replaced with the far more inclusive “Happy Holidays” uttered by politically correct Americans petrified to offend non-Christians. Corporate America quickly jumped on the bandwagon, rendering Christmas nothing more than a multinational celebration of “Holiday” consumerism. 

This year’s target is a #MeToo-themed siege on the “problematic” 1940’s Oscar-winning song “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” which has been called a “date-rape anthem” over its lyrics which feature a man attempting to cajole a woman into sleeping with him on a cold winter’s night. As a result, the song has been pulled from the radio by several stations around the country

In response to “snowflakes” offended by a male human attempting to copulate with a female without asking her to sign a consent form, the Holderness Family – which creates “original music, parodies and Vlogs,” has created a politically correct rendition of the song so as not to risk offending anyone: 

Click to accept cookies and enable this content

Conservatives just can’t believe what’s happening to holiday traditions…

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

As John Whitehead of The Rutherford Institute wrote last week in his article “To a Nation of Snowflakes, Christmas Has Become Another Trigger Word“:

READ  These Countries Are Quickly And Quietly Dumping The Dollar

Look around you.

When I was a child in the 1950s, the magic of Christmas was promoted in the schools. We sang Christmas carols in the classroom. There were cutouts of the Nativity scene on the bulletin board, along with the smiling, chubby face of Santa and Rudolph. We were all acutely aware that Christmas was magic.

Fast forward to the present day, and there is a phobia surrounding Christmas that has turned it into fodder for the politically correct culture wars.

Indeed, in its “Constitutional Q&A: Twelve Rules of Christmas,” The Rutherford Institute points out that some communities, government agencies and businesses have gone to great lengths to avoid causing offense over Christmas.

Examples abound.

Schools across the country now avoid anything that alludes to the true meaning of Christmas such as angels, the baby Jesus, stables and shepherds.

In many of the nation’s schools, Christmas carols, Christmas trees, wreaths and candy canes have also been banned as part of the effort to avoid any reference to Christmas, Christ or God. One school even outlawed the colors red and green, saying they were Christmas colors and, thus, illegal. 

Students asked to send seasonal cards to military troops have been told to make them “holiday cards” and instructed not to use the words “Merry Christmas” on their cards.

Many schools have redubbed their Christmas concerts as “winter holiday programs” and refer to Christmas as a “winter festival.”Some schools have cancelled holiday celebrations altogether to avoid offending those who do not celebrate the various holidays.

In Minnesota, a charter school banned the display of a poster prepared to promote the school’s yearbook as a holiday gift because the poster included Jack Skellington from Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas and other secular Christmas icons, not to mention the word “Christmas.”

In New Jersey, one school district banned traditional Christmas songs such as “Joy to the World” and “Silent Night” from its holiday concerts.  A New Jersey middle school cancelled a field trip to attend a performance of a play based on Charles Dickens’s “A Christmas Carol” because some might have found it “offensive.”

In Texas, a teacher who decorated her door with a scene from “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” including a scrawny tree and Linus, was forced to take it down lest students be offended or feel uncomfortable.

In Connecticut, teachers were instructed to change the wording of the classic poem “Twas the Night Before Christmas” to “Twas the Night Before a Holiday.”

In Virginia, a high school principal debated about whether he could mention Santa or distribute candy canes given that they were symbols of Christmas.

In Massachusetts, a fourth-grade class was asked to list 25 things that reminded them of Christmas. When one young student asked if she could include “Jesus,” her teacher replied that she could get fired if Christmas’ namesake appeared on the list.

Things are not much better outside the schools.

In one West Virginia town, although the manger scene (one of 350 light exhibits in the town’s annual Festival of Lights) included shepherds, camels and a guiding star, the main attractions—Jesus, Mary and Joseph—were nowhere to be found due to concerns about the separation of church and state.

In Chicago, organizers of a German Christkindlmarket were informed that the public Christmas festival was no place for the Christmas story. Officials were concerned that clips of the film “The Nativity Story,” which were to be played at the festival, might cause offense.

In Delaware, a Girl Scout troop was prohibited from carrying signs reading “Merry Christmas” in their town’s annual holiday parade.

While the First Amendment Establishment Clause prohibits the government from forcing religion on people or endorsing one particular religion over another, there is no legitimate legal reason why people should not be able to celebrate the season freely or wish each other a Merry Christmas or even mention the word Christmas.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.jshttps://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js
Source: zerohedge.com

READ  Trump-Xi Dinner Concludes With Applause; Lasts Longer Than Expected; Trump Then Rushes Off To AF1
Visited 2 times